How podcasts are changing the way we engage with art online… and offline: An interview with Tamar Avishai

Created in May 2016 by Boston based Tamar Avishai, The Lonely Palette has since presented a wide selection of paintings, art movements and artists. Most episodes go as follow: Tamar takes one work, usually at at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, interviews the public on their thoughts and feelings, and jumps off on an art historical analysis of the subject at hand, in a concise and engaging manner. MAYANNE SORET interviews her about making The Lonely Palette, and her journey as an art historian.

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Think Pink: A Conversation with Maxine Cheryl

Maxine Cheryl is the curator of @pinkfilmposters, an Instagram account which looks at the blend of pop culture and art presented by film posters and book covers in the context of the colour pink, focusing on everything vintage, gothic, horror, and giallo. Maxine is also a filmmaker in her own right, having written and directed the short film The Devil in Mary, and the upcoming The Porcelain Cradle, as well as the interactive documentary Venus Noire, which was created as part of her studies at the University of York. CHLOE ESSLEMONT meets with the young filmmaker and digital curator.

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From the TAH VOL.1 Archive – ‘The Reappearance of the Rose’: Instagram and The Aesthetic of Jean Cocteau

When Pierre Chanel wrote in Jean Cocteau and the French Scene that Cocteau’s style, with its ‘deceptive, free, quick, airy grace… [was] so inimitable that he has had no followers’[1], he unwittingly proves the outmodedness of the book to a contemporary reader. For now more than ever, perhaps, one is likely to encounter glimpses of this quick, airy grace, and far more likely to do so while scrolling through Instagram than strolling through a gallery. SAM LOVE looks at the instagram legacy of Jean Cocteau for TAH VOL.1

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From the TAH VOL.1 Archive – Boybands and Ephebe

Depictions of the ephebe, a youth caught in the transition from puberty to Greek civic manhood, dominated images of Greek culture and desire throughout the periods now known as the Archaic and Classical and remain the defining images of Greek art in Western understanding. In Ancient Greece, youth and beauty were key elements in the value of kalokagathia – that to look good was literally to be good. Obvious parallels to this can be found in contemporary celebrity culture – the worshiping of figures based on a cultivated outward image of wholesomeness and beauty. This dynamic is crystallised in those most modern ephebes; boybands. CLAIRE HESELTINE for TAH VOL.1

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